Broadcast Engineer at BellMedia, Computer history buff, compulsive deprecated, disparate hardware hoarder, R/C, robots, arduino, RF, and everything in between.
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How a cryptographer uses a key engraver

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Legendary cryptographer and security researcher Matt Blaze (previously) somehow acquired a key engraver and now he's "using it to engrave entirely serious labels on my keys that are not in any way ironic or confusing."

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tekvax
2 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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A Network Card For The Trash-80

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Around these parts, [Peter] is well-known for abusing the TRS-80 to do things it should never do. You can read Wikipedia on the TRS-80, you can look at Google Images, and you can browse the web. As with any retrocomputer, there are limitations for what you can do. To browse Wikipedia, [Peter] had to set up an AWS instance which translated everything and used serial to IP converters. It can be done, but it’s hard.

Now, after seeing a few interesting projects built around the ESP32, [Peter] built a network card for the TRS-80. It’s called the trsnic, and it’s a working network card for almost all the TRS-80s out there, with the eventual goal of supporting the TRS-80 Model I / II / III / 4 / 12 / 16 / 16B and 6000.

The idea for the trsnic comes from [Arno Puder]’s RetroStoreCard, a device that plugs into the TRS-80 Model III and connects it to a ‘personal cloud’ of sorts that hosts and runs applications without the need for cassettes or floppys. It does this with an ESP32 wired up to the I/O bus in the Model III, and it’s all completely Open Source.

[Peter] took this idea and ran with it. Thanks to the power found in the ESP32, real encrypted Internet communication can happen, and that means HTTPS and TLS.

Right now, documentation for the trsnic is limited, but the project does exist and building it is as easy as stuffing some headers and DIP sockets in a PCB and soldering them on. There’s a bit of work to do on the ESP32 code, but if you’re looking for a network card for your Trash-80, this is the one that works now.





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tekvax
6 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Chrome extension offers a distraction-free YouTube experience

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On the left is a screenshot of YouTube on Chrome. On the right is a screenshot of the same video with an extension called "Distraction Free for YouTube" activated. Below is a screenshot of the extension's options.

[via 5-Bullet Friday]

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tekvax
6 days ago
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#want
Burlington, Ontario
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The Deep Space Energy Crisis Could Soon Be Over

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On the face of it, powering most spacecraft would appear to be a straightforward engineering problem. After all, with no clouds to obscure the sun, adorning a satellite with enough solar panels to supply its electrical needs seems like a no-brainer. Finding a way to support photovoltaic (PV) arrays of the proper size and making sure they’re properly oriented to maximize the amount of power harvested can be tricky, but having essentially unlimited energy streaming out from the sun greatly simplifies the overall problem.

Unfortunately, this really only holds for spacecraft operating relatively close to the sun. The tyranny of the inverse square law can’t be escaped, and out much beyond the orbit of Mars, the size that a PV array needs to be to capture useful amounts of the sun’s energy starts to make them prohibitive. That’s where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) begin to make sense.

RTGs use the heat of decaying radioisotopes to generate electricity with thermocouples, and have powered spacecraft on missions to deep space for decades. Plutonium-238 has long been the fuel of choice for RTGs, but in the early 1990s, the Cold War-era stockpile of fuel was being depleted faster than it could be replenished. The lack of Pu-238 severely limited the number of deep space and planetary missions that NASA was able to support. Thankfully, recent developments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) appear to have broken the bottleneck that had limited Pu-238 production. If it pays off, the deep space energy crisis may finally be over, and science far in the dark recesses of the solar system and beyond may be back on the table.

Hot and Ready

Hot out of the oven – not. Pu-238 oxide RTG fuel slug glows red hot due to its radioactivity after removal from a graphite insulating blanket. Each slug can produce 62 watts of heat. Source: Los Alamos National Lab

The development and use of RTGs for space missions closely parallels the build-up of space programs in the middle of the previous century. The first RTG was invented in 1954 in the “Atoms for Peace” era of efforts to find non-destructive ways to harness the power of the atom. The promise was great; essentially unlimited power with no moving parts, that could be scaled up or down to fit a huge range of applications, from powering remote terrestrial applications like lighthouses and remote weather stations to running implantable pacemakers with a power source that would outlive the patient.

It would not be until 1961 that the first RTG would go to space, aboard a Navy navigation satellite. The first of the deep-space missions to sport RTG power were the Pioneer missions in the early 1970s, which paved the way for the ultimate test of the RTG: Voyager 1 and Voyager 2. Each of those spacecraft uses three RTGs containing 4.5 kg of Pu-238, producing 480 watts of total power per vehicle at launch. More than forty years later, the RTGs are still working, their output greatly diminished by the passage of a fair fraction of the 87.7-year half-life of the fuel pellets and general degradation of the electrical system. But they still work, and probably will for at least another year or two.

Cutaway of a General-Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG). The Pu-238 fuel pellets are encased in the stack of GPHS blocks in the center. Source: NASA Radioisotope Power Systems

The design of RTGs for space is fairly simple. Radioactive fuel is pressed into pellets that are covered with protective materials. The fuel is nestled into a container called the heat source, whose only job is to get hot. The heat source is slipped into another container, this one lined with thermocouples. The inside surface, in direct contact with the hot canister of decaying fuel, has the hot junctions of the thermocouple, while the cold junctions face out into the vacuum of space. The temperature difference is the key to creating electric power via the Seebeck effect, which is the same idea behind Peltier chips.

The Voyager mission’s RTGs were the “multi-hundred watt RTG” (MHW-RTG) that used silicon-germanium thermocouples, 312 per RTG. Later missions like Cassini and Galileo used a different design, the GPHS-RTG, or “general-purpose heat source RTG.” These RTGs were very similar to the MHW-RTG, with similar electrical design but a better, more efficient fuel package. The most recent RTGs are the “multi-mission RTGs” (MMRTGs) which have advanced thermocouples using lead telluride and an alloy called TAGS (tellurium, silver, germanium, and antimony). The Mars Curiosity rover has MMRTGs, as does the Mars 2020 Rover.

Robots to the Rescue

The nuclear alchemy used to produce Pu-238 and other radioisotopes is complex and extremely dangerous to conduct. Pu-238 was originally produced by bombarding uranium-238 with deuterium nuclei in a reactor, but later it was discovered that the production of Pu-239 for bomb cores yielded byproducts that could be more easily converted into Pu-238. Starting in the mid-1960s, all the Pu-238 for US civilian and military use was produced by neutron irradiation of neptunium-237 followed by chemical separation.

In 1988, the nuclear reactors at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina were turned off, and America’s Pu-238 spigot dried up. Even when the reactors were operating, production was a slow and hazardous process, resulting in only a few kilograms a year. Since 1993, NASA has sourced its Pu-238 from Russia, but they only managed to supply 16.5 kg of the stuff before they too shut down production.

In December of 2015, Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee produced the first Pu-238 in the US in nearly 30 years – 50 grams worth. The production process was laborious, with the bulk of the work going into making neptunium-237 pellets. The pellets were made by hand by adding Np-237 and aluminum powder and squeezing it into pellets suitable for neutron bombardment.

The best the lab could manage by hand was about 80 neptunium pellets a week, far short of the goal of 275 pellets a week. To achieve that level of production and ramp up from 50 grams of Pu-238 a year to 400 grams, ORNL has recently introduced an automated method of producing neptunium pellets. Details are hard to come by – plutonium production methods tend to be somewhat closely guarded for national security reasons – but if the neptunium pellets turn out to perform well in the reactors, ORNL could well be on the way to rebuilding the Pu-238 stockpile.

True, even if this automation advance proves itself, the total production capacity of Pu-238 in the US will still be under half a kilogram per year. But if the technology works, it can be replicated at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and at the Idaho National Lab, tripling the nation’s output and approaching NASA’s goal of 1.5 kilograms on plutonium-238 a year by 2025.

NASA appears optimistic that the deep-space energy crunch is nearing an end thanks to the new technology, but it’s still a long way from over. Nearly all of the 35 kilograms total inventory of Pu-238 that was available in 2015 has either been slated for future missions or is unsuitable for use in RTGs for deep-space.





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tekvax
8 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Drone Gives Up Its Wireless Secrets To Zigbee Sniffer

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There’s something thrilling about decoding an unknown communications protocol. You start with a few clues, poke at the problem with some simple tools, and eventually work your way up to that first breakthrough that lets you crack the code. It can be frustrating, but when you eventually win, it can be very rewarding.

It seems that [Jason] learned this while decoding the wireless conversation between his mass-market quad and its controller. The quad in question, a Yuneec Q500, is one of those mid-range, ready-to-fly drones that’s targeted at those looking to get in the air easily and take some cool pictures. Unsure how the drone and controller were talking, [Jason] popped the covers and found a Zigbee chipset within. With the help of a $14 Zigbee USB dongle and some packet sniffing software from TI, [Jason] was able to see packets flowing, but decoding them was laborious. Luckily, the sniffer app can be set up to stream packets to another device, so [Jason] wrote a program to receive and display packets. He used that to completely characterize each controller input and the data coming back from the drone. It’s a long and strange toolchain, but the upshot is that he’s now able to create KML in real time and track the drone on Google Earth as it flies. The video below shows the build and a few backyard test flights.

Congratulations to [Jason] for breaking the protocol and opening up drones like this for other hackers. If you’re interested in learning more about Zigbee sniffing, you can actually hack a few smarthome gadgets into useful sniffers.

 





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tekvax
8 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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A Tiny IDE For Your ATtiny

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When writing code for the ATtiny family of microcontrollers such as a the ATtiny85 or ATtiny10, people usually use one of two methods: they either add support for the chip in the Arduino IDE, or they crack open their text editor of choice and do everything manually. Plus of course there are the stragglers out there using Eclipse. But [Wayne Holder] thinks there’s a better way.

The project started out as a simple way for [Wayne] to program the ATtiny10 in C under Mac OS, but has since evolved into an open source, cross-platform integrated development environment (IDE) for programming a wide range of ATtiny chips in C, C++, or Assembly. Not only does it integrate the source code editor and programmer, but it even bundles in documentation for common variants of the chips including block diagrams and pinouts; making it a true one-stop-shop for ATtiny hacking.

His IDE runs under Java, including OpenJDK, and [Wayne] provides a stable pre-built executable for those who don’t want to clone the whole GitHub repository. He’s included the GNU/AVR toolchains, though notes that testing so far has been limited to Mac OS, and he’s interested in feedback from Windows and Linux users. Assembly is done either with GNU AVR-AS, or an assembler of his own design, though the latter is currently limited to the ATTiny10.

To actually get the code onto the chip, the IDE supports using the Arduino as a programmer as well as dedicated hardware like the BusPirate or the USBasp. If you go the Arduino route, [Wayne] has even come up with a little adapter board which he’s made available through OSH Park to help wrangle the diminutive chips.

The ATtiny10 might have something of a learning curve, but in exchange this family of tiny microcontrollers offers an incredible amount of capability. When you’re working with what’s essentially a programmable grain of rice, the only limit is your own creativity.





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tekvax
8 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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