Broadcast Engineer at BellMedia, Computer history buff, compulsive deprecated, disparate hardware hoarder, R/C, robots, arduino, RF, and everything in between.
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To fix Canadian copyright, let creators claim their rights back after 25 years

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Copyright markets are -- and always have been -- broken. People make art because they have to, and there's always a middle-man ready to take advantage of the oversupply of willing creators to grab our rights and pay us peanuts.

That's why expanding the term or scope of copyright does little to help creators, especially less-well-known artists or those at the beginning of their careers. When you give a person with no bargaining power more rights, the bullies who've been grabbing the lion's share all along simply take the new rights, too. Merely expanding copyright is like giving your bullied kid more lunch money in the hopes that the bullies will leave them with enough to buy something to eat.

But there's a better way!

One of the best features of the US copyright system is "reversion": this allows creators to fill in a few forms and take back their copyrights after 35 years, even if they have entered into a "perpetual assignment of copyright" with a publisher, studio, label or other party.

Creators at the start of their careers have no negotiating leverage, and most creative works have no commercial life after the first couple of years. Reversion allows the small minority of creators who have attained fame to take back the copyrights they were strong-armed into surrendering when they were unknowns, and it allows other, less-successful creators to take back their creations and distribute them in small, independent editions that give them new life.

Canada is contemplating a sweeping set of copyright reforms; as in inevitable on these occasions, the process has been dominated by batshit proposals from giant corporations who've bilked some creators to front for them.

But one proposal stands out for its sensible, pro-creator obviousness: singer Bryan Adams' proposal to create a 25-year reversion system for creators. Such a system would allow creators like Adams (whose own career peaked long enough ago to allow him to claim back his most successful works under this rule) to right the old wrongs in the contracts he signed when he was starting out.

As Australian copyright scholar Rebecca Giblin notes, this system was once in place in Australia, but was abolished in 1968. Importantly, reversion systems are one of the few areas of copyright that are not tightly constrained by impossible-to-alter international copyright treaties like the Berne Convention and the WTO's TRIPS.

If you're an American who wants to revert your 35-year-old rights, check out the Authors Alliance tool for streamlining the process.

In the book industry my research into almost 100,000 titles has found that publishers license older e-books to libraries on the same terms and for the same prices as newer ones. That includes “exploding” licences which force books to be deleted from collections even if nobody ever borrows them.

Publishers are interested in maximising their share of library collections budgets, not ensuring that a particular author continues to get paid or a particular title continues to get read.

As a result libraries often forgo buying older (but still culturally valuable) books even though they would have bought them if the publisher cared enough to make them available at a reasonable price.

Restricting access to books is not in the interests of authors or readers.

Everything he does, he does it for us. Why Bryan Adams is on to something important about copyright [Rebecca Giblin/The Conversation]

(Image: Gerardo Gonzalez, CC-BY)

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tekvax
6 hours ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Listen to William Shatner and Henry Rollins's duet of "Jingle Bells"

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William Shatner is unleashing a Christmas album next month. Titled "Shatner Claus," it features guest performances by Henry Rollins (Black Flag), Iggy Pop, Rick Wakeman (Yes), Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull), Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top), and many more. Released by Cleopatra Records, "Shatner Claus" is just the latest in ol' Bill's lengthy recording career that includes "Ponder the Mystery" (2013), "Seeking Major Tom" (2011), "Has Been" (2004), "William Shatner Live" (1977), and, of course, "The Transformed Man" (1968).

Below, Shatner and Rollins "sing" Jingle Bells:

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tekvax
4 days ago
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THIS!
Burlington, Ontario
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DIY Rubber Ducky is as Cheap as its Namesake

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The “Rubber Ducky” by Hak5 is a very powerful tool that lets the user perform rapid keystroke injection attacks, which is basically a fancy way of saying the device can type fast. Capable of entering text at over 1000 WPM, Mavis Beacon’s got nothing on this $45 gadget. Within just a few seconds of plugging it in, a properly programmed script can do all sorts of damage. Just think of all the havoc that can be caused by an attacker typing in commands on the local machine, and now image they are also the Flash.

But unless you’re a professional pentester, $45 might be a bit more than you’re looking to spend. Luckily for the budget conscious hackers out there, [Tomas C] has posted a guide on using open source software to create a DIY version of Hak5’s tool for $3 a pop. At that cost, you don’t even have to bother recovering the things when you deploy them; just hold on tight to your balaclava and make a run for it.

The hardware side of this hack is the Attiny85-based Digispark, clones of which can be had for as low as $1.50 USD depending on how long your willing to wait on the shipping from China. Even the official ones are only $8, though as of the time of this writing are not currently available. Encapsulating the thing in black shrink tubing prevents it from shorting out, and as an added bonus, gives it that legit hacker look. Of course, it wouldn’t be much of a hack if you could just buy one of these little guys and install the Rubber Ducky firmware on it.

In an effort to make it easier to use, the official Rubber Ducky runs scripts written in a BASIC-like scripting language. [Tomas C] used a tool called duck2spark by [Marcus Mengs], which lets you take a Rubber Ducky script (which have been released by Hak5 as open source) and compile it into a binary for flashing to the Digispark.

Not quite as convenient as just copying the script to the original Ducky’s microSD card, but what do you want for less than 1/10th the original’s price? Like we’ve seen in previous DIY builds inspired by Hak5 products, the trade-off is often cost for ease of use.

[Thanks to Javier for the tip.]







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tekvax
5 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Exploring an Abandoned Toys “R” Us

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If someone asked me to make a list of things I didn’t expect to ever hear again, the question “Do you want to go to a Toys “R” Us?” would be pretty near the top spot. After all of their stores (at least in the United States) closed at the end of June 2018, the House of Geoffrey seemed destined to join Radio Shack as being little more than a memory for those past a certain age. A relic from the days when people had to leave their house to purchase goods.

But much to my surprise, a friend of mine recently invited me to join him on a trip to the now defunct toy store. His wife’s company purchased one of the buildings for its ideal location near a main highway, and before the scrappers came through to clean everything out, he thought I might like a chance to see what was left. Apparently his wife reported there was still “Computers and stuff” still in the building, and as I’m the member of our friend group who gets called in when tangles of wires and sufficiently blinking LEDs are involved, he thought I’d want to check it out. He wasn’t wrong.

Readers may recall that Toys “R” Us, like Radio Shack before it, had a massive liquidation sale in the final months of operations. After the inventory was taken care of, there was an auction where the store’s furnishings and equipment were up for grabs. I was told that this location was no different, and yet a good deal of material remained. In some cases there were no bidders, and in others, the people who won the auction never came back to pick the stuff up.

So on a rainy Sunday evening in September, armed with flashlight, camera, and curiosity, I entered a Toys “R” Us for last time in my life. I found not only a stark example of what the changing times have done to retail in general, but a very surprising look at what get’s left behind when the money runs out and the employees simply give up.

Front End

Upon first entering the store, I was struck with how much of a wreck the place looked. At this point it had only been closed for around two months, but the lack of regular maintenance combined with the remnants of the store’s chaotic final days were enough to give it a post-apocalyptic look. We were greeted with puddles of water and a collection of half assembled toys which someone abandoned a few feet from the front door.

Once we were able to get the main power back on and light up the store, the first surprise was that the point-of-sale systems appeared to all be intact. On closer inspection, we found that the computers themselves had been removed, but that the displays, scanners, receipt printers, pinpads, and even cash drawers were left in place. As this is the same kind of hardware that I’ve seen at nearly every big box retailer I’ve ever been to, I was surprised that nobody purchased any of it during the auction.

Past the registers was a kiosk with a large touch screen computer and printer, after a bit of research, it seems these were installed in 2011 so customers could print a paper copy of a child’s “Wish List” from the Toys “R” Us website. There’s perhaps a statement to be made here about the people who were still shopping at the store towards the end of it’s run: the customers who would want a printed copy of something that most of us would simply look up on our phones are probably the sort of customer who avoided online shopping as well. Installation of these kiosks were likely seen as playing to the needs of their rapidly shrinking customer base.

The security office was placed, as you might expect, off to the side of the registers. This room was stripped bare and full of assorted trash, which makes sense as the security staff were likely let go before the floor associates. Unlikely anyone was too concerned about stopping shoplifters during a liquidation sale.

Interestingly enough, the security DVR and monitor were still in place, and when powered back up started cycling through a handful of cameras, nearly all of which seemed to be either broken or knocked ajar during the clean-out. It was certainly a very creepy and unsettling way to preface our journey deeper into the store.

Electronics Department

The electronics section looked like it was hit hardest by those looking for hidden treasures in the store’s final days. Some locks were broken to get into drawers, and displays were ripped out of their mounts. Here we found some of the first potentially useful hardware: a number of screens that would play videos about the products they were advertising when you pressed the buttons on them. Apparently there weren’t many hackers present for the final fire sale.

Vault Room

Don’t get too excited, there was no Goonies-style treasure hidden in the vault, that’s one thing you can be sure nobody forgot to collect on closing day. We did find an incredible number of keys and lock cores laid out, most likely from employees desperately trying to find some key that nobody realized was misplaced until the store was about to get shuttered. Here we also found a full box of documents dealing with the comings and goings of cash from the armored car service. In hindsight, the fact that this was left behind should have been a hint for what was yet to be revealed.

Phone Room

This area would be a paradise for phone phreaks. Personally I’ve never been terribly interested in telephony gear, but even I was shocked at how much stuff was still here. The Comdial manufactured DXP blade server which apparently ran the store’s phone system on a Motorola 68000 CPU was still up and running, as was a “Messaging and Telephony Server” built by Indyme.

Also in this room was the hardware for the internal paging system, volume controls for the various speakers in the ceilings, as well as the Verizon I-211M-L Optical Network Terminal (ONT) that connected the building’s internal systems to the FiOS network.

Server Room

Now this was more my style. While the servers themselves were gone, there was still plenty of infrastructure left, including some Cisco routers and gigabit switches. There was also a rack where four of their in-house smartphone type devices were charging and ready to go.

Taped to the rack was a memo left from Toys “R” Us explaining that the servers must remain on and connected to the Internet until the store’s official “Vacate Day”. It seems that they were wiped remotely, presumably so corporate could account for the destruction of credit card numbers or other personally identifying customer information that was housed on them. They were then either removed physically or perhaps sold during the auction. The memo also indicates a similar fate befell the point-of-sale systems.

As an interesting note, the yellow box labeled “ST600” turns out to be a device that can determine not only how many people have entered the store but also how large they are. The idea being this would give Toys “R” Us insight on how many adults entered the store with children in tow.

Records Room

We don’t know what this room actually was, but we decided pretty quickly what we’d refer to it as. While the tech we found throughout the store was interesting, what we found here was actually quite disturbing. This room contained several boxes full of personal information about employees at this particular Toys “R” Us location, down to their medical history and tax forms. As soon as we entered the room, we found a photocopy of one woman’s drivers license and Social Security card laying on the table.

The amount of personal information left behind for anyone to find was really staggering, especially since these were the company’s own employees. We saw the great lengths the company went to protect customer information, so to see how little regard they had for their own people was honestly infuriating.

At the time of this writing, there’s still a question of what to do with all of this documentation. My suggestion was to just start a bonfire behind the store and burn it there before even more people run their eyes over it, but reader suggestions are welcome.

Workshop

We’ll leave the horrifying discoveries of the Records Room behind and conclude our tour with something I thought was perhaps the most surprising find of the whole trip: the Workshop. This area was setup to do maintenance and repairs on products, presumably with a focus on bikes and the like. Considering how many large companies would simply chuck something in the compactor the moment it’s deemed defective, it was sort of endearing to find they at least attempted to provide a repair service.

What Gets Left Behind

I’ll admit this was the first time I ever got a close look at the aftermath of a major retailer going belly-up. Perhaps I’m just naive in being shocked that personal information and valuable infrastructure would be left behind when the doors were locked for the very last time. Perhaps it’s standard operating procedure in these cases. But it doesn’t make me feel any better about it.

I wonder how the situation will play out for each of the nearly 800 Toys “R” Us locations which have been shuttered. Was this particular location a fluke? What would have happened if somebody less scrupulous had purchased this building and got a hold of the documentation within? It’s a question that I fear we’ll soon know the answer to as more of these locations hit the open market.





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tekvax
5 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Get Your PCBs Made at the Mall

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As we’ve seen with some recent posts on the subject here at Hackaday, there seems to be a growing schism within the community about the production of PCBs. Part of the community embraces (relatively) cheap professional fabrication, where you send your design off and get a stack of PCBs in the mail a couple weeks later. Others prefer at home methods of creating PCBs, such as using a CNC, laser engraver, or even the traditional toner transfer. These DIY PCBs take some skill and dedication to produce, but the advantage is that you can have the board in hand the same day you design it. But there may be a third option that seems to have slipped through the cracks.

[Virgil] writes in with a very interesting method of producing professional looking prototype PCBs that doesn’t involve weeks of waiting for the results, nor does it require any complicated techniques or specialized equipment. In this method, a UV printer is used to deposit your mask directly onto the copper clad board, which you then etch with whatever solution you like. Don’t have a UV printer you say? No worries, there’s probably somebody at the mall that does.

As [Virgil] explains, the little kiosks at the mall which offer to personalize items for customers generally use a UV printer which allows them to shoot ink on nearly any material. Instead of asking them to put a logo on the back of your phone, you’ll just be asking them to put the vector file of your mask, which you can bring along on a USB flash drive, onto the bare copper board. They may tell you they can’t guarantee the ink will stick to the bare copper, but just tell them you’re willing to take the risk. It’s one of those situations in which your money will be glad to speak on your behalf.

After the UV printer does its thing, the mask might be somewhat fragile. [Virgil] likes to wrap the boards in plastic for the ride home to make sure they don’t get damaged. Then it’s a quick dunk in the etching solution followed by a rinse and some isopropyl alcohol to get the remainder of the UV ink off. The results really do speak for themselves: nice sharp lines with exceptionally little manual work.

We’ve covered some relatively easy ways of quickly producing nice PCBs at home, as long as you don’t mind spending a couple hundred US dollars to get the hardware together. This seems to be the best of both worlds, though it does have the downside of requiring you speak with another human. We’d love to hear from any readers who give this particular method a shot.





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tekvax
5 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Linux programmer developing tools for new open source Code of Conduct

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Coraline Ehmke is a leading figure in the push to make Linux programming more welcoming and inclusiv, supplementing the project's famed Code of Conflict with an enforceable Code of Conduct project called CoC Beacon. (more…)
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tekvax
6 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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