Broadcast Engineer at BellMedia, Computer history buff, compulsive deprecated, disparate hardware hoarder, R/C, robots, arduino, RF, and everything in between.
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New Project: Tinker Crafting for Minecraft

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Tinker-Crafting-featuredModel your dream fortress in Tinkercad, then export it to Minecraft.

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LittleBits New CloudBit Module Simplifies Internet-Controlled Projects

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Cloud_1HRlittleBits formally released their CloudBit module today — and announced a retail partnership with RadioShack that further expands the sales reach of the growing company.

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Auction: Elvis's 1963 Rolls with phone

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Elvsss

Elvis's 1963 Rolls Royce, complete with this car phone, will be auctioned off next month with an expected hammer price of $200,000 - $300,000.

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Why don't ice cream sandwiches melt anymore? Because they're full of weird crap

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ice cream sandwiches_1405467508804_6844764_ver1.0_640_480

Area Mom grossed out to discover that ice cream she bought her kids contains so much artificial junk in it, it won't melt in the hot sun. This is a local television news segment of greatness. [via @nextdraft]

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Cold War Clock is all Tubes

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A clock built from tubes

 

Clocks are great projects to build. They serve a real purpose, and there’s a wide variety of ways to implement a unique timepiece. [Hank]‘s Cold War Clock only uses parts and technologies that were available in 1959. It contains no semiconductors, but has an audible alarm and reasonable time accuracy.

Looking through the hand drafted schematics, you’ll find a number of Dekatron tubes. These vintage components are used as registers to store and count the time. [Hank] found some cheap Soviet Dekatrons, but had to machine his own sockets to connect them. These tubes do the counting, but the actual display consists of nixies.

A cost estimate puts this clock at $2130 in 1959, which equates to $17040 today. Clearly this would be outside the price range of most hobbyists. The actual build cost [Hank] around $1600.

There’s some intricate details in this build. The front panel has an authentic look to it, and the manual has instructions for “demolition of clock to prevent enemy use.” [Hank] calls it a “creative anachronism.” In a sense, it’s a reproduction of a product that never actually existed.

A video of this clock in action, including the Cold War era alarm, is after the break.


Filed under: classic hacks, clock hacks
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tekvax
16 hours ago
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#love #want
Burlington, Ontario
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How To: Hack Your Way Into Your Own Gated Community

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RF Signal Decryption and Emulation

Does your Gated Community make you feel secure due to the remote-controlled gate keeping the riffraff out? Residents of such Gated Communities in Poland are now shaking in fear since [Tomasz] has hacked into his own neighborhood by emulating the signal that opens the entrance gate. Shockingly, this only took about 4 hours from start to finish and only about $20 in parts.

Most of these type of systems use RF communication and [Tomasz's] is no difference. The first step was to record the signal sent out by his remote. A USB Software Defined Radio transmitter/receiver coupled with a program called SDR# read and recorded the signal without a hitch. [Tomasz] was expecting a serialized communication but after recording and analyzing the signal from several people entering the community it became clear that there was only one code transmitted by everyone’s remote.

Now that he knows the code, [Tomasz] has to figure out a way to send that signal to the receiver. He has done this by making an RF transmitter from just a handful of parts, the meat and potatoes being a Colpitts oscillator and a power amplifier. This simple transmitter is connected to a DISCOVERY board that is responsible for the modulation tasks. [Tomasz] was nice enough to make his code available on his site for anyone that is interested in stopping by for a visit.


Filed under: security hacks
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tekvax
16 hours ago
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...and this is why we can never have anything nice!
Burlington, Ontario
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