Broadcast Engineer at BellMedia, Computer history buff, compulsive deprecated, disparate hardware hoarder, R/C, robots, arduino, RF, and everything in between.
2655 stories
·
3 followers

Periodic Table of Fireworks #4thofJuly #fireworks #chemistry

2 Shares

NewImage

Periodic Table of Fireworks Via Sciencenotes.org.

Fireworks are a colorful display on summer nights. Have you ever wondered about the chemistry of those bright colored explosions? The colors produced depend on the elements added to the firework before they are launched. This periodic table of fireworks highlights the common elements used to produce colors and effects.

Element 3: Lithium

Lithium is used to add red color to a firework. The most common form of lithium used is lithium carbonate, Li2CO3.

Element 6: Carbon

Carbon is typically black in color, making it useless for night sky displays. It serves as the fuel for the combustion of the firework. It is also important in fireworks as a component of black powder. Black powder is used as the propellant to launch the firework into the sky. Carbon is also found in the ash of black snakes fireworks.

Element 8: Oxygen

Oxygen does not impart a color to fireworks, but oxygen is essential to cause the reactions that produce the colors. It is also the main element in the combustion of the firework.

Element 11: Sodium

Sodium burns with a bright yellow color. Common table salt NaCl is often used for yellow color in a firework.

Element 12: Magnesium

Magnesium imparts a bright white light when burned. Magnesium chloride, MgCl2 is used to produce bright sparks and enhance the brilliance of a firework.

Element 13: Aluminum

Aluminum metal is used to produce silver colored sparks. The most common use of this in fireworks is the sparkler.

Element 17: Chlorine

Chlorine is a common component of the metal salts used to produce colors in fireworks. It is also found in many of the oxidizing agents used to fuel the combustion reactions.

Element 19: Potassium

Potassium is a component of many of the oxidizers used in fireworks. Potassium chlorate (KClO3), potassium nitrate (KNO3) or saltpetre, and potassium perchlorate (KClO4) are all common oxidizers used as fuel for propellants and combustion.

Element 20: Calcium

Calcium is used to produce an orange color to fireworks. Adding calcium to a firework also deepens the colors produced in the combustion.

Element 22: Titanium

Titanium metal is added to produce silver colored sparks.

Element 26: Iron

Iron is added to produce sparks. The color of the sparks depends on the temperature of the burning iron. The color can range from red to bright orange in fireworks.

Element 29: Copper

Burning copper salts are responsible for the blue colors seen in fireworks.

Element 30: Zinc

Zinc metal is used to produce smoke effects in fireworks.

Element 38: Strontium

Strontium salts are used to produce red in many fireworks. Strontium is also used to stabilize the chemical mixtures in fireworks.

Element 51: Antimony

The glitter effect seen in many fireworks is produced by burning antimony.

Element 56: Barium

Barium salts produce green in fireworks. The common barium salt used is barium chloride, BaCl2. Barium is also used to stabilize firework mixtures.

Read more.

Read the whole story
tekvax
11 hours ago
reply
Burlington, Ontario
Share this story
Delete

OMG It’s R2-D2 ! I Loved Him in Star Trek! (Funny Tee)

1 Share

r2

After my Batman shirt, which gets me stopped about 10 times per day, this is the second most awesome shirt ever.

[OMG It’s R2-D2 ! I Loved Him in Star Trek!]

The post OMG It’s R2-D2 ! I Loved Him in Star Trek! (Funny Tee) appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

Read the whole story
tekvax
23 hours ago
reply
Burlington, Ontario
Share this story
Delete

Enthusiast Builds Computer Without The Micro

1 Share
Credit: James Newman

Credit: James Newman

A British man who is building a 16-bit computer by hand fears it may not fit into his house. James Newman’s machine is so big because he’s using individual transistors rather than an integrated chip.

According to Newman, the idea of the project is to build a computer he can literally see working. That means using an old-school approach by fitting together around 14,000 transistors of the type you’d find in an electronic store, along with 3,500 LED lights to display information.

If and when it’s completed, the computer will have a mere 256 bytes of RAM and a clock speed of 20 kilohertz. That puts it considerably behind the Intel 8080 chip launched in 1974 that arguably made it possible to have personal computers that fit easily in the home.

Newman has broken down the individual components of the computer into separate wall-mounted frames and has now finished three frames: the Arithmetic & Logic Unit, a State and Status section, and the General Purpose Registers.

The problem is that based on the work so far, the finished computer will be 14 meters long and weigh around 1,100 pounds. That could make it difficult both to store in his single-storey home and to transport, jeopardising his idea of using it as an education exhibit.

Newman told The Register that to date he has spent around £20,000 (approx $US32,000) on the project. When it’s complete, he intends to start running games such as Tetris and, ominously for 80s sci-fi fans, tic-tac-toe.

The post Enthusiast Builds Computer Without The Micro appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

Read the whole story
tekvax
23 hours ago
reply
Burlington, Ontario
Share this story
Delete

The Schwartz is Strong With These Spaceballs LEGO Models [Pics]

1 Share

spaceb1

LEGO builder NvdK has uploaded two unique Spaceballs LEGO Models to the LEGO Ideas site so that they can possibly one day become official LEGO sets: the Eagle 5 and Spaceballs One. Both sets look absolutely fantastic, and if you want them to become reality, be sure to head over to LEGO ideas and vote for them!

spaceb2

spaceb3

spaceb4

spaceb5

spaceb6

spaceb7

[LEGO Ideas: Eagle 5Spaceball One | Via NA]

The post The Schwartz is Strong With These Spaceballs LEGO Models [Pics] appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

Read the whole story
tekvax
1 day ago
reply
Burlington, Ontario
Share this story
Delete

The Reason Why You Might HATE Cilantro [Science Video]

1 Share

Cilantro tastes like soap to some people, but they may not just be picky. It could be genetic.

[SciShow]

The post The Reason Why You Might HATE Cilantro [Science Video] appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

Read the whole story
tekvax
1 day ago
reply
Burlington, Ontario
Share this story
Delete

25 HILARIOUS Clothing Tags [Pics]

1 Share

clothing-tags1

[Via TechEblog]

The post 25 HILARIOUS Clothing Tags [Pics] appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

Read the whole story
tekvax
1 day ago
reply
Burlington, Ontario
Share this story
Delete
Next Page of Stories