Broadcast Engineer at BellMedia, Computer history buff, compulsive deprecated, disparate hardware hoarder, R/C, robots, arduino, RF, and everything in between.
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There's an EpiPen shortage. Parents of kids with serious allergies prepare for back-to-school without the life saving medication.

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The EpiPen is a widely used medical device that delivers emergency medication to prevent someone with a severe allergic reaction from going into anaphylactic shock. There's a shortage of EpiPens across the United States. Parents of kids with serious allergies are worried about sending their kids back to school without one. (more…)
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tekvax
4 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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19,000 Hours of Apollo 11 Audio Recordings

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From Space.com:

Over the eight-day, 3-hour Apollo 11 mission, astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins stayed in constant communication with mission control and supporting teams. The back-and-forth conversations, which took place over what are called communication “loops,” were released to the media, because NASA is required to make its work public. But these fragile physical recordings had to be stored in special, climate-controlled vaults.

Now, thanks to a dedicated collaborative effort between NASA and the University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas), all 19,000 hours of audio recordings from the Apollo 11 mission have been converted into a digital format and are available online.

Read more and check out the NASA and UT Dallas collections.

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tekvax
7 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Dropping Superglue Into a Borax Solution Causes a Surprising Reaction! [Video]

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What happens when you mix a large amount of super glue and a warm borax solution? A crazy reaction that’s what!

[The King of Random]

The post Dropping Superglue Into a Borax Solution Causes a Surprising Reaction! [Video] appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

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tekvax
10 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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NASA Releases Apollo 11 Audio Archive

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Credit: University of Texas at Dallas

NASA has released 19,000 hours of audio recordings from the Apollo 11 mission.

The collection covers communications both on-board, at mission control and between the two. It was made up of 200 tapes, each 14 hours long and made up of 30 audio tracks.

The recordings have been released under the rules that NASA’s work should be publicly available. Work began to digitise the tapes in 2012 but it’s taken so long as they were only playable on a specific machine called a SoundScriber (pictured) of which only one was available.

The machine was set up so that users had to manually turn a handle to switch track, something that would have made the digitization impractically long. Staff at the University of Texas rigged up a system to read and record all 30 tracks simultaneously.

Another reason for the slow progress was that the digital audio had to be clear enough to accurately transcribe the audio, a particular challenge as any some tracks included as many as 35 different voices. The project also involved using NASA text archives to build a dedicated language base for automated speech recognition.

The recordings have been made available on two sites: as a relatively unorganized collection on the Internet Archive and as a more attractively packaged dedicated site. The latter includes options to explore the recordings day by day, go straight to highlights, or play a random recording.

The post NASA Releases Apollo 11 Audio Archive appeared first on Geeks are Sexy Technology News.

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tekvax
10 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Op Amps Before Transistors: A 600V Vacuum Tube Monster

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Op amps. Often the first thing that many learn about when beginning the journey into analog electronics, they’re used in countless ways in an overwhelmingly large array of circuits. When we think about op amps, images of DIPs and SOICs spring to mind, with an incredibly tiny price tag to boot. We take their abundance and convenience for granted nowadays, but they weren’t always so easy to come by.

[Mr Carlson] serves up another vintage offering, this time in the form of a tube op amp. The K2-W model he acquired enjoyed popularity when it was released as one of the first modular general purpose amplifiers, due to its ‘compact form’ and ‘low price’. It also came with large application manuals which helped it to gain users.

In order to power up the op amp and check its functionality, +300V and -300V supplies are needed. [Mr Carlson] is able to cobble something together, since it’s very apparent that he has an enviable stash of gear lying around. A 600V rail to rail supply is not something to be taken lightly, though it does give this particular model the ability to output 100V pk-pk without any distortion.

The op amp is set up as an inverting amplifier, and once powered on proves to work flawlessly. As always, the video is an entertaining watch, stuffed full of retro electronics trivia. We’re big fans of [Mr Carlson]’s work, and have previously written about his adventures with a colossal walk-in AM radio transmitter, as well as his restoration of a 1930s oscilloscope and subsequent transformer de-potting.





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tekvax
10 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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Stylistic analysis can de-anonymize code, even compiled code

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A presentation today at Defcon from Drexel computer science prof Rachel Greenstadt and GWU computer sicence prof Aylin Caliskan builds on the pair's earlier work in identifying the authors of software and shows that they can, with a high degree of accuracy, identify the anonymous author of software, whether in source-code or binary form. (more…)

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tekvax
10 days ago
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Burlington, Ontario
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